Archive for the ‘alabama’ Tag

Plea from Alabama 8th Grade Teacher   19 comments

 

I teach in Alabama, and will do anything I can do help defeat Common Core. We are experiencing a crucial week in Alabama. We have two bills, SB 190 and HB 254 to stop Common Core. SB 190 was not defeated, but “held indefinitely” in committee while they work on amendments.

The identical House bill, HB 254 was brought up in a subcommittee, and I was asked to speak at that hearing. I was told that we didn’t have the votes in that subcommittee, but that in the actual entire House, we are only TWO votes from knowing we have a passing vote. So the goal of my speech was to “buy time.” And that’s exactly what happened. I spoke from the heart, I cried, and so did many in the room. Again, it was not defeated, but sent to the entire House Committee to be “held” for more research.

This week, it is time to increase pressure on Governor Bentley. He’s ALWAYS been on our side. But we feel we need to kindly pressure him to force the legislators’ hands.

The governor’s office number is 1-334-242-7100, for anyone who’d like to leave a message to repeal Common Core. I think he really needs to hear from other states, to know it’s a huge national issue, and that he could pave the way for other states.”  –8th grade World History Teacher, Tuscaloosa County

The first state to successfully pull out of Common Core will greatly increase other states’ odds of pulling out. Please call!

Phone number for Alabama’s Governor Bentley 334-242-7100

ALABAMA DEBATES COMMON CORE WITHDRAWAL THIS WEEK   Leave a comment

 

This is a huge week for educational liberty and for the future quality of education in Alabama.  Other states are watching breathlessly.

The AL legislature will listen to testimony from both sides of the argument and will decide whether or not to pass SB 190.  If passed, the bill would:

  • prohibit implementation of Common Core;
  • prohibit state bodies from compiling/sharing data about students or teachers except under limited circumstances;
  • prohibit the State Board of Education from ceding control to an entity outside the state; and
  • require notice and public hearings before the State Board of Education adopts or implements any statewide standards.

 

This is such a good and important bill –for reasons that are academic, financial and constitutional.

Yet, Alabama’s pro-common core superintendent fears that Alabama will be “an island” if the state votes to withdraw from Common Core.

An island of educational freedom in a nation of now mostly fettered states– is bad thing?

An island of potentially high educational standards that could soar beyond the unpiloted experiment called Common Core– that’s a bad thing?

An island of educational solvency, no longer under mandate to implement the costly and unwanted technologies demanded by Common Core– also a bad thing?

Both the pro- and anti- Common Core groups cite detrimental effects on the economy and on the children’s academic achievements as reasons to implement –or to drop– Common Core.  Only the pro-common core side cites a fear of being isolated.

I’ll bet there were people in the 1700’s who feared withdrawing from Great Britain’s rule over the American colonies for the same reason.  There are always those who would prefer to risk dying like a lemming than to stand independently.

My questions to the AL superintendent would be:

How bad was it before, when we were “isolated,” before the advent of Common Core?  Were we unable to work collaboratively with other states before?  If not, what prevents us from working with others now?  We don’t have to be fettered to others to collaborate with the best they have to offer.

What Alabama –or any state– would be isolated from, would be great things to skip out on:  skip the unpiloted experiment, skip the micromanagement of state education data by the federal testing/data collection system; skip “standards” mandates coming forth from secret closed-door meetings of the CCSSO (the Council of Chief State School Officers, FYI, is a group that, along with whomever Bill Gates pays to join his agenda– created, and continues to create, the federally-promoted common standards.)

Many people across the nation are praying for Alabama this week.  We are praying that those who study this issue look at the whole issue and all of its intended and unintended consequences.

It is not enough to study common core on academic points, although they are in trouble on their own; the Common Core initiative hurts the states it touches in many ways– in academics, in finances, in constitutionality, and in the ability to have any voice in future decisions over local education.

 

Which States Aim to Reclaim Educational Liberty?   57 comments

RECLAIM EDUCATIONAL LIBERTY

Many people –including bipartisan U.S. groups  and freedom fighters   in other nations— are working to save educational liberty.  We are waking up to shake off the chains that have settled over education.

Please leave a comment if you know of updates to this chart. 

United States Against Common Core State Standards (CCSS)

and Washington, D.C.

State  Websites Videos Other
1. Alabama http://www.auee.org/ http://vimeo.com/60017609
2. Alaska
3. Arizona http://arizonansagainstcommoncore.com
4. Arkansas http://www.uaedreform.org/sandra-stotsky/
5. California http://cuacc.org/ http://teacher-anon.blogspot.com/
6. Colorado www.parentledreform.org

http://nepc.colorado.edu/author/ohanian-susan

www.bobschaffer.org

http://greatlakescenter.org/docs/Policy_Briefs/Mathis_NationalStandards.pdf

7. Connecticut http://vimeo.com/60214843 https://blogush.edublogs.org/
8. Delaware http://education.nationaljournal.com/2012/05/common-core-makes-waves.php
9. Florida https://www.facebook.com/pages/Stop-Common-Core-in-Florida/516780045031362 http://truthabouteducation.wordpress.com/
10. Georgia http://stopcommoncore.com/ http://youtu.be/coRNJluF2O4 http://www.invisibleserfscollar.com

http://www.dissidentprof.com/

11. Hawaii
12. Idaho http://idahoansforlocaleducation.com/
13. Illinois https://www.facebook.com/pages/Stop-Common-Core-in-Illinois/388021897963618 StopcommoncoreIllinois@yahoo.com

jphjuly12@yahoo.com

14. Indiana  http://hoosiersagainstcommoncore.com/ http://indianapublicmedia.org/news/house-senate-halts-common-core-standards-45398/
15. Iowa   http://iowansforlocalcontrol.com
16. Kansas http://www.kslegislature.org/li/b2013_14/measures/hb2289/
17. Kentucky  scholarmom@gmail.com
18. Louisiana http://soitgoesinshreveport.blogspot.com/
19. Maine
20. Maryland
21. Massachusetts http://pioneerinstitute.org/
22. Michigan  www.SCCinMichigan.com http://improvek-12schools.blogspot.com/

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Stop-Common-Core-in-Michigan/303312003109291

23. Minnesota  http://edlibertywatch.org/
24. Mississippi
25. Missouri http://moagainstcommoncore.webs.com/ http://www.missourieducationwatchdog.com
26. Montana
27. Nebraska
28. Nevada
29. New Hampshire http://nhcornerstone.org

thomas.newkirk@unh.edu

http://networkforeducation.org/
http://nhfamiliesforeducation.org/
https://www.facebook.com/NHSchoolChoice

30. New Jersey http://youtu.be/rSEVsEa9XEg

http://youtu.be/wEkN8Sgca0I

http://www.aasa.org
31. New Mexico
32. New York http://gothamschools.org
33. North Carolina http://mgmfocus.com

http://www.nceducationalliance.org

34. North Dakota https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Stop-Common-Core-in-North-Dakota/431076243650481
35. Ohio Ohio Common Core – Roots and Reality of Education Standards
36. Oklahoma http://www.restoreokpubliceducation.com/
37. Oregon http://zhaolearning.com/2009/08/06/96/
38. Pennsylvania  http://www.ceopa.org/education-standards.aspx reedmom54@gmail.com
39. Rhode Island http://youtu.be/sBSgchJe2Z0
40. South Carolina https://www.facebook.com/StopCommonCoreInSouthCarolina?ref=stream http://www.electmikefair.com/?p=220
41. South Dakota http://legiscan.com/SD/bill/HB1204/2013
42. Tennessee http://tnacc.weebly.com
43. Texas http://www.glennbeck.com/2013/03/15/how-common-core-is-dumbing-down-america%E2%80%99s-schoolchildren/

http://educatefortexas.wordpress.com

44. Utah http://www.utahnsagainstcommoncore.com/ http://youtu.be/Mk0D16mNbp4

http://youtu.be/5XBsbxYJHms?t=11s

http://sutherlandinstitute.org/
45. Vermont
46. Virginia http://www.doe.virginia.gov/news/
47. Washington http://betrayed-whyeducationisfailing.blogspot.com/
48. West Virginia
49. Wisconsin
50. Wyoming cruisebrok@aol.com

Video: Alabama Federation of Republican Women: Stand Against Common Core   2 comments

This week, the vivacious president of the Alabama Federation of Republican Women spoke at the Wetumpka Tea Party meeting.

Here’s a video of the event.

“Would you like Obama in your child’s classroom?  How about Bill Ayers?”

In a related forum, Alabamians United for Excellence in Education (AUEE) put out the following press release:

Contacts:

Sharon Sewell        Email:  intrepidlyjoyful@hotmail.com       Phone:   334/324-0035
Donna Burrage         Email:  wdburrage@bellsouth.net             Phone:  205/553-2888

CITIZENS TASK FORCE RESPONDS TO GOP HOUSE LEGISLATIVE AGENDA
Asks Alabama Legislature to Include Legislation that Returns K-12 Education to Parents

BIRMINGHAM, AL:   A new citizens group, formed to return K-12 education to parents, responded quickly to the Alabama House Speaker’s press release about the legislative priorities of the Alabama Republican House members and specifically about the absence of a bill to protect Alabama values and states rights in education.  The group, Alabamians United for Excellence in Education (AUEE), met on January 18th to discuss mutual concerns of how to protect Alabama children from becoming part of a national database, mandated by Common Core, and their curriculum being controlled by the federal government.  The group feels that a bill to preserve state education sovereignty and to protect our children from becoming part of a national database and tracked without parental permission should be included as a top priority by the House.

Members of the citizens task force include parents, teachers, representatives from conservative organizations, and other concerned individuals who find that state’s rights and Alabama values are in jeopardy, and that Alabama has ceded its constitutional rights to decide what values and subjects our children study in schools.

Spokesperson and retired teacher Sharon Sewell, who served as a member of Alabama’s textbook committee, stated:  “We support the House’s focus on protecting the constitutional rights of Alabama citizens, but we notice the absence of what we consider the top priority — preserving the constitutional rights of parents and the state to decide what values and subjects our children study in school.  We are concerned about the transformational overhaul of K-12 now being implemented in our schools; and textbooks, which do not reflect Alabama values, are being aligned to Common Core.  Our bill is the only bill under discussion that can return education decisions to Alabamians.”

Kathy Peterson, another member of this citizens task force, stated, “While I applaud the idea of the Speaker of the House appointing a ‘Commission on State Rights and Alabama Values’ to solicit input from the public, the meetings were not publicly advertised, so attendance was scarce.”  Peterson stated she attended one meeting and commission members reported that the repeal of Common Core to return parental authority and local control was brought up at every meeting.  “Therefore,” she stated, “I can’t understand why a bill to defund and repeal Common Core is not backed by the Speaker.”

Elois Zeanah, president of the Alabama Federation of Republican Women, stated: “I’m surprised that the Speaker did not choose to include repealing Common Core as a priority, especially since the school flexibility bill the Speaker cited does nothing to protect Alabama values, parental rights or state sovereignty in education.  It’s urgent that the legislature withdraw from Common Core this year since Common Core will be fully implemented in 2014.  We hope the House Caucus will add this goal to their priority list to protect Alabama citizens from the federal government.”

—- —- —-

Go, Fight, Win, Alabama!

Bills and Resolutions Against Common Core: South Carolina, Indiana, Missouri and Alabama   6 comments

 I’m posting the bills from South Carolina, Indiana,  and Missouri which have attempted to reclaim state educational decision-making for those states.  I’m also posting the resolution unanimously passed by the Alabama Republican Women’s Federation, cosponsored by the Republican Women’s Federations from Delaware, Tennessee, Nebraska, etc.

So far, we have nothing like this in Utah, although at every political meeting I go to or hear about, the majority of citizens are extremely interested in getting our state free of Common Core. 

Utah representatives, do you hear your constitutents?

—– —– —– —–

SOUTH CAROLINA S.604

South Carolina General Assembly
119th Session, 2011-2012
Download This Bill in Microsoft Word format

S. 604

STATUS INFORMATION

General Bill
Sponsors: Senators Fair, Grooms, Bryant, Campsen, Bright and S. Martin

Introduced in the Senate on February 23, 2011

Summary: Common Core State Standards

——————————————————————————-
2/23/2011 Senate Introduced and read first time (Senate Journal-page 19)
2/23/2011 Senate Referred to Committee on Education

A BILL  TO AMEND ARTICLE 5, CHAPTER 1, TITLE 59 OF THE 1976 CODE, RELATING TO GENERAL PROVISIONS CONCERNING EDUCATION, BY ADDING SECTION 59-1-490 TO PROVIDE THAT THE COMMON CORE STANDARDS MAY NOT BE IMPOSED ON SOUTH CAROLINA.

Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of South Carolina:

SECTION 1. Article 5, Chapter 1, Title 59 of the 1976 Code is amended by adding:

“Section 59-1-490. The State Board may not adopt and the State Department may not implement the Common Core State Standards developed by the Common Core State Standards Initiative. Any actions taken to adopt or implement the Common Core State Standards as of the effective date of this section are void ab initio.”

SECTION 2. This act takes effect upon approval by the Governor.

—– —– —– —–

INDIANA SENATE BILL No. 193

DIGEST OF INTRODUCED BILL

Citations Affected: IC 20-19-2-14.5.

Synopsis: Common core state educational standards. Provides that the state board of education may not adopt as standards for the state any common core educational standards developed by the Common Core State Standards Initiative. Voids any action taken to adopt common core educational standards.

Effective: July 1, 2013.

Schneider

    January 7, 2013, read first time and referred to Committee on Education and Career Development.

First Regular Session 118th General Assembly (2013)

SENATE BILL No. 193

    A BILL FOR AN ACT to amend the Indiana Code concerning education.

Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of Indiana:

SOURCE: IC 20-19-2-14.5; (13)IN0193.1.1. –>     SECTION 1. IC 20-19-2-14.5 IS ADDED TO THE INDIANA CODE AS A NEW SECTION TO READ AS FOLLOWS [EFFECTIVE JULY 1, 2013]: Sec. 14.5. (a) As used in this section, “common core standards” refers to educational standards developed for kindergarten through grade 12 by the Common Core State Standards Initiative.     (b) Notwithstanding section 14 of this chapter, the state board may not adopt as standards for the state or direct the department to implement any common core standards developed by the Common Core State Standards Initiative.     (c) After June 30, 2013, any action taken by the state board before July 1, 2013, to adopt common core standards as standards for the state is void.

—– —– —– —– —–

MISSOURI SENATE BILL 210

FIRST REGULAR SESSION
SENATE BILL NO. 210
97TH GENERAL ASSEMBLY
INTRODUCED BY SENATORS LAMPING AND NIEVES.

Read 1st time January 24, 2013, and ordered printed.

TERRY L. SPIELER, Secretary.
1218S.01I

AN ACT
To amend chapter 161, RSMo, by adding thereto one new section relating to the
Common Core Standards Initiative.

Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of Missouri, as follows:

Section A. Chapter 161, RSMo, is amended by adding thereto one new
2 section, to be known as section 161.855, to read as follows:      161.855.

Notwithstanding any provision of law to the contrary, 

2 the state board of education and the department of elementary and
3 secondary education shall not implement the Common Core State
4 Standards developed by the Common Core Standards Initiative. Any
5 actions taken to adopt or implement the Common Core State Standards
6 as of the effective date of this section are void. Common Core State
7 Standards or any other statewide education standards shall not be
8 adopted or implemented without the approval of the general assembly.
http://www.senate.mo.gov/13info/pdf-bill/intro/SB210.pdf

—– —– —– —–

NATIONAL FEDERATION OF REPUBLICAN WOMEN RESOLUTION

Defeat National Standards for State Schools

Passed Unanimously at the NFRW36th Biennial Convention Kansas City, MO – October 1, 2011

 

WHEREAS, The national standards-based “Common Core State Standards” initiative is the centerpiece of the Obama’s Administration’s agenda to centralize education decisions at the federal level;

WHEREAS, The Obama Administration is using the same model to take over education as it used for healthcare by using national standards and boards of bureaucrats, whom the public didn’t elect and can’t fire or otherwise hold accountable;

WHEREAS, National standards remove authority from States over what is taught in the classroom and how it is tested;

WHEREAS, National standards undercut the principle of federalism on which our nation was founded;

WHEREAS, There is no constitutional or statutory authority for national standards, national curricula, or national assessments and in fact the federal government is expressly prohibited from endorsing or dictating state/local decisions about curricula; and

WHEREAS, The Obama Administration is attempting to evade constitutional and statutory prohibitions to move toward a nationalized public-school system by (1) funding to date more than $345 million for the development of national curriculum and test questions, (2) tying national standards to the Race to the Top charter schools initiative in the amount of $4.35 billion, (3) using the Common Core State Standards Initiative (CCSSI) to pressure State Boards of Education to adopt national standards with the threat of losing Title 1 Funds if they do not, and (4) requesting Congress to include national standards as a requirement in the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary School Act (No Child Left Behind);

BE IT RESOLVED, That the National Federation of Republican Women vote to encourage all State Federation Presidents to share information about national standards with their local clubs; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, That State Federation Presidents ask their members to (1) contact their State Boards of Education members and request that they retain control over academic standards, curriculum, instruction and testing,  (2) contact their Congress Members and request that they (i) protect the constitutional and statutory prohibitions against the federal government endorsing or dictating national standards, (ii) to refuse to tie national standards to any reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, (iii) defund “Race to the Top” money, and (iv) prohibit any more federal funds for the Common Core State Standards Initiative, including funds to assessment and curriculum writing consortia, and (3) spread the word about the threat of a federal government takeover of education.

Submitted by:  Alabama Federation of Republican Women

Elois Zeanah, President

Co-Sponsors:

Nebraska Federation of Republican Women, Delaware Federation of Republican Women, Wisconsin Federation of Republican Women,  Georgia Federation of Republican Women,  Tennessee Federation of Republican Women

National Federation of Republican Women: Defeat Common Core   3 comments

The document I’ve pasted here is co-sponsored by the Republican Women’s Federations of Alabama, Nebraska, Delaware, Wisconsin, Georgia, and Tennessee.

Do you think it is time for Utah to join them?

NATIONAL FEDERATION OF REPUBLICAN WOMEN RESOLUTION

Defeat National Standards for State Schools
Passed Unanimously at the NFRW36th Biennial Convention
Kansas City, MO – October 1, 2011

WHEREAS, The national standards-based “Common Core State Standards” initiative is the centerpiece of the Obama’s Administration’s agenda to centralize education decisions at the federal level;

WHEREAS, The Obama Administration is using the same model to take over education as it used for healthcare by using national standards and boards of bureaucrats, whom the public didn’t elect and can’t fire or otherwise hold accountable;

WHEREAS, National standards remove authority from States over what is taught in the classroom and how it is tested;

WHEREAS, National standards undercut the principle of federalism on which our nation was founded;

WHEREAS, There is no constitutional or statutory authority for national standards, national curricula, or national assessments and in fact the federal government is expressly prohibited from endorsing or dictating state/local decisions about curricula; and

WHEREAS, The Obama Administration is attempting to evade constitutional and statutory prohibitions to move toward a nationalized public-school system by (1) funding to date more than $345 million for the development of national curriculum and test questions, (2) tying national standards to the Race to the Top charter schools initiative in the amount of $4.35 billion, (3) using the Common Core State Standards Initiative (CCSSI) to pressure State Boards of Education to adopt national standards with the threat of losing Title 1 Funds if they do not, and (4) requesting Congress to include national standards as a requirement in the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary School Act (No Child Left Behind);

BE IT RESOLVED, That the National Federation of Republican Women vote to encourage all State Federation Presidents to share information about national standards with their local clubs; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, That State Federation Presidents ask their members to (1) contact their State Boards of Education members and request that they retain control over academic standards, curriculum, instruction and testing, (2) contact their Congress Members and request that they (i) protect the constitutional and statutory prohibitions against the federal government endorsing or dictating national standards, (ii) to refuse to tie national standards to any reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, (iii) defund “Race to the Top” money, and (iv) prohibit any more federal funds for the Common Core State Standards Initiative, including funds to assessment and curriculum writing consortia, and (3) spread the word about the threat of a federal government takeover of education.

Submitted by: Alabama Federation of Republican Women
Elois Zeanah, President

Co-Sponsors:

Nebraska Federation of Republican Women
Delaware Federation of Republican Women
Wisconsin Federation of Republican Women
Georgia Federation of Republican Women
Tennessee Federation of Republican Women

Alabama Bursts Free of 2 Common Core Testing Consortia Memberships   Leave a comment

Alabama has cut its membership ties with both of the Common Core testing consortia– with PARCC and SBAC.

This is big news because those who want to federalize eduation and control citizens thereby cannot do so very easily without the shackling effect of having virtually every person in America labeled and tracked using the common testing data collection system.   Yay for Alabama.

Alabama hasn’t cut ties with the whole Common Core State Standards Initiative, but according to Truth in American Education, Governor Bentley of Alabama said:

“Every state is different. Every Legislature is different. I think having one standard goes against the intent of the founding fathers of the United States.” 

The Governor cast his vote against the standards.  State Board of Education Members Stephanie Bell and Betty Peters also voted against the standards.

http://truthinamericaneducation.com/uncategorized/governor-bentley-alabama-condemns-common-core-standards/

And Ed Week’s Catherine Gewertz reports:

“In an email to EdWeek, the state’s assessment director, Gloria Turner, confirmed that Alabama has bowed out of both the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers, or PARCC, and the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium. She said the department of education “has decided to go in another direction,” but didn’t offer any more detail.

The move wasn’t yet official within the two consortia, since the requisite processes haven’t yet been completed. The decision leaves PARCC with 22 members and Smarter Balanced with 24.

Alabama, you might recall, has been one of the dwindling number of states that have been playing ‘participating,’ or ‘advisory’ roles in each consortium.”

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/curriculum/2013/02/alabama_withdraws_from_both_te.html?cmp=ENL-EU-NEWS2

Alabama Governor: “Education Standards Don’t Need To Be Tied To Federal Core.”   Leave a comment

http://www.tuscaloosanews.com/article/20120910/NEWS/120909761/1307/opinion01?p=1&tc=pg

Governor Bentley of Alabama

 

 

Is relatively little federal funding controlling Alabama education?

By John Hill, reposted from Tuscaloosa News.com–

When Alabama’s State Board of Education voted 7-2 to adopt Common Core State Standards two years ago, it joined 45 states and three U.S. territories. The Common Core, created by the National Governors Association’s Center for Best Practices and the Council of Chief State School Officers, standardized education curricula among the states with the aim of better preparing students for college and the modern workforce.

One year later, the board reconvened to consider rescinding its earlier decision. Even though Gov. Robert Bentley joined the opposition on the grounds that he believed the standards were tantamount to a federal takeover of public education, the board voted 6-3 to follow the Common Core.

This issue reared its head again in August when the Alabama State Department of Education began work to seek a waiver from the U.S. Department of Education to end required Adequate Yearly Progress reporting. The average yearly progress requirement under No Child Left Behind requires that states make measurable progress toward 100 percent proficiency in reading and math or face a possible reduction in federal education funds.

Alabama and other states applying for the No Child Left Behind waiver must declare whether they have already adopted or are planning to adopt the Common Core standards. If Alabama joins the 33 states that have already received this waiver, Alabama would be exempt from average yearly progress reporting but would effectively be required to adopt the Common Core Standards. To make matters more serious, the U.S. Department of Education has signaled that future funding for low-income schools may eventually be linked to the adoption of the Common Core.

But Alabama has already adopted the Common Core Standards, so what’s the big deal? Although the Common Core has been promoted as a voluntary program, the Obama administration essentially linked participation in Common Core to billions of dollars in grants offered through the Race to the Top Fund, which was part of the 2009 stimulus.

In short, the waiver has the potential to prevent Alabama from modifying its own educational standards in the future.

The federal government stands to gain tremendous sway in Alabama’s education through the implementation of a common national education standard, and many Alabamians may be shocked to find out what a sweetheart deal Uncle Sam is getting for such power. Even though the federal government has authorized funding for key portions of local school district budgets since it passed the Elementary and Secondary School Act of 1965, the amount of money given to states is not as large as some believe. According to the State Department of Education, about one in every six dollars of the $7.3 billion spent on Alabama’s K-12 education in the 2010-2011 school year came from the federal government. Yet for this relatively small percentage of assistance, the federal government already has a heavy hand in the educational standards for Alabama’s children.

This possible takeover of public education curricula raises serious legal questions. According to three different federal acts — the General Education Provisions Act, the Department of Education Organization Act and the aforementioned Elementary and Secondary School Act of 1965 as amended by the No Child Left Behind — federal departments and agencies are generally banned from “directing, supervising, or controlling elementary and secondary school curriculum, programs of instruction, and instructional materials.”

Even if incorporating the Common Core standards and getting an average yearly progress waiver substantially benefited public education in Alabama, these benefits may come at the cost of Alabama making its own educational decisions in the future. Alabama’s request for a No Child Left Behind waiver should contain language explicitly stating that it is not seeking a waiver from established protections against the federal government controlling state education. As Gov. Bentley has said, “We want our standards to be extremely strong. They just don’t need to be tied to a federal core.”

John Hill is the senior policy analyst at the Alabama Policy Institute, an independent, non-profit research and education organization.

Posted September 10, 2012 by Christel Swasey in Uncategorized

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