Archive for the ‘rights of sovereignty’ Tag

Thank You, Senator Lee   Leave a comment

Utah Senator Mike Lee is a rare patriot.

He actually did what all the senators are supposed to be doing:  he defended the U.S. Constitution from the tentacles of the United Nations– again!

He defended our freedoms:  national sovereignty and parental rights, when others lightly dismissed the seriousness of the threat to these sacred things.

The article below is reposted from Lee’s op-ed in USA Today:http://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2012/12/06/treaty-disabled-mike-lee/1752473/

 

Treaty backers can’t have it both ways

If the U.N. convention won’t affect U.S. laws, how can it change other nations?

by Senator Lee

December  6. 2012 – Supporters of the U.N. Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities are attempting to have it both ways. They dismiss as a myth any concerns about protecting sovereignty or parental rights because the treaty lacks a formal enforcement mechanism. They suggest that Congress can simply ignore any United Nations demand that isn’t in our national interest.

USA Today’s view:  Disabled Senate rejects U.N. rights treaty

Yet they simultaneously argue that U.S. ratification is necessary in order to force other countries to institute reforms. This inconsistent logic begs the question: If the treaty cannot be used to force changes in American law, how can it then be used to change the laws of other countries?

Ironically, no one highlighted this inconsistency more eloquently during Tuesday’s floor debate than one of the treaty’s most ardent supporters, Sen. John Kerry: “When  have words or suggestions that have no power, that cannot be implemented, that have no access to the courts, that have no effect on the law of the United States, and cannot change the law of the United States, when has that ever threatened anybody in our country?”

Or any other country, for that matter.

Supporters argue the treaty  gives us a seat at the international table. But America already sits at the head of that table. Our laws are the gold standard for protecting the rights of disabled persons. Nothing about Tuesday’s vote changes that. We continue to be influential throughout the world in promoting the Americans with Disabilities Act as the model for other countries. Ratifying the treaty would not strengthen our hand, nor would it provide further rights or benefits for Americans at home.

At best, the treaty is ineffective. At worst, it could have grave consequences for U.S. domestic law. By their very nature, treaties diminish our sovereign authority to govern ourselves. Parties to this particular convention must answer to an unaccountable U.N. committee and are subject to its directions. If you believe Sen. Kerry, then the U.S. has nothing to worry about, but also no reason to support the treaty. If he is wrong, we have many reasons to oppose it.

Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, is a member of the Foreign Relations Committee.

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Amen.

Thank you, Senator Hatch   Leave a comment

Dear Mrs. Swasey:
Thank you for sharing your thoughts about the United Nation’s Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD). It is good to hear from you.
As you may know, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the CRPD in 2006 and President Obama transmitted it to the Senate earlier this year.  The Senate Foreign Relations Committee held only one hearing on this treaty and quickly reported it to the full Senate.  As one of the principle authors of the Americans with Disabilities Act, I support this treaty’s general goal of promoting the rights and opportunities of persons with disabilities but believe that an international treaty is the wrong means of achieving that goal.
The CRPD would authorize a United Nations committee of individuals chosen by foreign countries to evaluate whether, in its opinion, a ratifying country is complying with the treaty.  If the United States ratified it, this committee would scrutinize our political, social, cultural, and even family life.  Since a ratified treaty has the same legal status as the Constitution itself, this treaty undermines American sovereignty and self-government.
With these concerns in mind, I voted against the CRPD on December 4, 2012. The 61-38 vote was fewer than the 2/3 margin that the Constitution requires for ratification.  However, I will continue to support legitimate ways of promoting the rights and opportunities of persons with disabilities.
Once again, thank you for writing.
Your Senator,
Orrin G. Hatch
United States Senator
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