Archive for the ‘government schools’ Tag

2012 FTC Alert: To Prevent Child Identity Theft at School   2 comments

FTC Consumer Alert:Protect Your Child’s Personal Information at School

http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/pubs/consumer/alerts/alt056.shtm

First, here are a few bullet points for readers in a hurry:

  • children whose identities have been stolen usually don’t find out until they are adults.
  • parents have the right to opt out of allowing schools to share child data with third parties.
  • if you don’t put your opt-out request in writing at your school, the general public may have access to your child’s private information
  • parents have the right to see surveys and instructional materials before they are handed out to students
  • you have the right to ask to see your child’s records and to correct errors in them.

The following FTC Consumer Alert from August 2012 is reposted in full below.

FTC Consumer Alert

Protecting Your Child’s Personal Information at School

Back to school — an annual ritual that includes buying new notebooks, packing lunches, coordinating transportation, and filling out forms: registration forms, health forms, permission slips, and emergency contact forms, to name a few. Many school forms require personal and, sometimes, sensitive information. In the wrong hands, this information can be used to commit fraud in your child’s name. For example, a child’s Social Security number can be used by identity thieves and other criminals to apply for government benefits, open bank and credit card accounts, apply for a loan or utility service, or rent a place to live.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the nation’s consumer protection agency, cautions that when children are victims of identity theft, the crime may go undetected for years — or at least until they apply for a job, a student loan or a car loan, or want to rent an apartment.

Limiting the Risks of Identity Theft

There are laws that help safeguard your child’s and your family’s personal information. For example, the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), enforced by the U.S. Department of Education, protects the privacy of student education records. It also gives parents of school-age kids the right to opt-out of sharing contact or other directory information with third parties, including other families.

If you’re a parent with a child who’s enrolled in school, the FTC suggests that you:

  • find out who has access to your child’s personal information,and verify that the records are kept in a secure location.
  • pay attention to materials sent home with your child, through the mail or by email, that ask for personal information. Look for terms like “personally identifiable information,” “directory information,” and “opt-out.” Before you reveal any personal information about your child, find out how it will be used, whether it will be shared, and with whom.
  • read the annual notice schools must distribute that explains your rights under FERPA. This federal law protects the privacy of student education records, and gives you the right to:
    • inspect and review your child’s education records;
    • consent to the disclosure of personal information in the records; and
    • ask to correct errors in the records.
  • ask your child’s school about its directory information policy. Student directory information can include your child’s name, address, date of birth, telephone number, email address, and photo. FERPA requires schools to notify parents and guardians about their school directory policy, and give you the right to opt-out of the release of directory information to third parties. It’s best to put your request in writing and keep a copy for your files. If you don’t opt-out, directory information may be available not only to the people in your child’s class and school, but also to the general public.
  • ask for a copy of your school’s policy on surveys. The Protection of Pupil Rights Amendment (PPRA) gives you the right to see surveys and instructional materials before they are distributed to students.
  • consider programs that take place at the school but aren’t sponsored by the school. Your child may participate in programs, like sports and music activities, that aren’t formally sponsored by the school. These programs may have web sites where children are named and pictured. Read the privacy policies of these organizations, and make sure you understand how your child’s information will be used and shared.
  • take action if your child’s school experiences a data breach. Contact the school to learn more. Talk with teachers, staff, or administrators about the incident and their practices. Keep a written record of your conversations. Write a letter to the appropriate administrator, and to the school board, if necessary.

File a complaint

You may file a written complaint with the U.S. Department of Education. Contact the Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20202-5920, and keep a copy for your records.

For More Information

To learn more about child identity theft and how to deal with its consequences, read Safeguarding Your Child’s Future or visit ftc.gov/idtheft.

You may have additional rights under state law: contact your local consumer protection agency or your state attorney general for details.

About the FTC

The FTC works to prevent fraudulent, deceptive and unfair business practices in the marketplace and to provide information to help consumers spot, stop and avoid them. To file a <a href=”https://www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov/&#8221; data-mce-href=”https://www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov/”>complaint</a&gt; or get <a href=”/bcp/consumer.shtm” data-mce-href=”/bcp/consumer.shtm”>free information on consumer issues</a>, visit <a href=”http://ftc.gov/&#8221; data-mce-href=”http://ftc.gov/”>ftc.gov</a&gt; or call toll-free, 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357); TTY: 1-866-653-4261. Watch a video, <span style=”text-decoration: underline;” data-mce-style=”text-decoration: underline;”><a href=”/multimedia/video/scam-watch/file-a-complaint.shtm” data-mce-href=”/multimedia/video/scam-watch/file-a-complaint.shtm”>How to File a Complaint</a></span>, at <a href=”/video” data-mce-href=”/video”>ftc.gov/video</a> to learn more. The FTC enters consumer complaints into the <a href=”/sentinel/” data-mce-href=”/sentinel/”>Consumer Sentinel Network</a>, a secure online database and investigative tool used by hundreds of civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and abroad.

The Need for Parental Empowerment in Education: From Renee Braddy   8 comments

The comments and stories below were written by Renee Braddy (dark hair, the mom the middle of the three moms photo above)

   “Last year I was at my daughter’s elementary school when I overheard a conversation between a family and the principal.  This family’s kindergarten son had qualified for all-day kindergarten.  And, let me say that qualifying for this so called service of all-day kindergarten is a JOKE!!!  I cannot emphasize that enough.  I watched and listened carefully as my daughter was administered the same test.  I was actually asked by the teacher administering the test to wait in the hall while the test was given.  As a former teacher who is greatly opposed to parents being left in the dark and as an involved and curious parent, I requested that I be allowed to just sit in the corner.  Pathetic!

This boy was from a family that I’m assuming spoke English as their second language.  I heard the father translating questions from the mother to the principal.  The first question was, “what time will he have lunch?”

The next question was, “how long does his lunch last?”

The last question that I heard was the father asking, “Can his mother come and get him from school to bring him home to have lunch with her?”

It broke my heart.  Here were parents who wanted to have their child home and yet felt obligated to have him in school all-day based on a very poor assessment.  I could tell that they sincerely wanted to do what was best for him.

   I wanted to scream at the top of my lungs, “don’t do it!  You DON’T HAVE TO SEND HIM TO SCHOOL ALL DAY!  You are his parents and YOU can offer him SO MUCH MORE.”

The hardest part for me was the end of the conversation when the principal answered the question about whether or not this boy’s mother would be allowed to have her son come home for lunch each day.  The principal seemed perplexed and stammered for a minute and then said, “well, ummmm, you are the first person that has EVER asked me that.”  He then thought for a bit longer and said, “I think we could probably arrange for that to happen.”

I couldn’t help but think, “Are you kidding me?  Why do parents have to ask for permission to do what they feel is in the best interest of their child?  Do we even understand that we have choices and that we are not obligated to send our children to all-day kindergarten or to school at all?”

   Have we really come this far in society that we don’t understand that we are the parents and we as such God has given us stewardship over our children?

2.      I have a nephew that didn’t speak a word until after his fourth birthday.  He would have easily qualified for government funded preschool.  Fortunately, he was the fifth child and his parents had gained experience and wisdom.  His mother kept him home with her and taught him and worked with him and when he began to finally speak, he spoke in full sentences and is now in 4thgrade and  at the top of his class.

I have a friend who does very well financially and her daughter qualified for government funded preschool at the age of two because she didn’t speak.  I said to her,“are you kidding me, wouldn’t that be every 2 year old?”

She said, “I know, I just figured that if they were offering the service, I would take advantage of it, then I wouldn’t have to get a babysitter while I go to the gym.”

Unfortunately, this is the mentality of far too many parents.  We have come to not only accept these so-called services, but many actually expect them.

I am sure you are hearing from very qualified well-intentioned individuals who are so-called experts in educating children.  I know because many of them were my professors and colleagues when I taught school.  I was shocked when I saw Dr. Nancy Livingston, whom was one of my BYU professors at BYU testifying to the importance of the state board adopting preschool standards.

Although, I have respect for these individuals, I do not think they have a deep appreciation for freedom and liberty.  When I went to talk to my former principal in Provo about concerns that I have with Common Core, she asked me what I was really concerned about.  I told her that I believe we are heading down a path towards socialism.

She shrugged her shoulders and said, “like Canada and Australia”.  She wasn’t concerned.

I then said, “I am worried that if we can nationalize education and make all the standards common, what’s keeping us from mandating equal funding to education?”

She said, “I would love that, wouldn’t that be great!”

I asked her, “Where will the money come from?”

She said, “I don’t know, but wouldn’t that be great, I would just love to have the resources that other states have.”

I was blown away and had to excuse myself as I knew we were too philosophically unaligned to have any further meaningful discussion on the matter.

In my opinion, we need to give the responsibility of being a parent back to the parents.  I believe that this would be the best service and gift that we could give to children.

I would love to talk to you further about this.  Again, I don’t claim to be an expert, but I DO NOT believe the statement, “those that start behind, stay behind.”  THIS IS SIMPLY NOT TRUE!

Children are not machines or robots, they are individuals and their needs vary.  We cannot put them into these so-called High Quality Preschools with a ratio of 1:10 or 1:20 and expect to solve society’s problems.”

–   –   –   –   –   –   –   –  –

Thank you, Renee.

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